May Poll

In your opinion, have governments effectively interpreted the financial effect of the pandemic on small businesses across Canada?

Comments


It seems that small businesses ie proprietorships mean nothing at all to the government at this time or any other time.
Every perk or benefit is more geared for the corporate world. And heaven forbid if you employee family members they do not count as they not at arms length.
So the samll Mom and Pop, family business suffers.

By Alice Manderson on May 28, 2020


Have governments effectively interpreted the financial effect of the pandemic on small businesses across Canada?  With regard to the federal government: No.  The more important question is, however: Does the federal government actually care?  The answer to that question is: If the health of Canadian small business is a concern to Trudeau’s bosses in China, then the federal government cares; otherwise, it cares not.  Oh, they can send out TV spots where the federal government says, “thank you” to front-line workers, but this is akin to someone wanting to show off each day thanking firemen for their bravery, so each night he goes off and starts another fire.  I do not matter to this government; you do not matter to this government.  They wring their hands after they’ve let the horse out of the barn, but all they care about is: a) making sure you don’t label the virus with regard to its place of origin, and b) ensuring you spend no time in contemplation of the fact that all of this could have been avoided in the first place, if the federal government had had the guts to say “Stay home!” to people from infected areas.  Sadly, in our new world order, with our new wonderful religion of Multiculturalism and its spawn, Political Correctness, firmly entrenched in First World society, it is probably a crime to even simply opine on such matters.

By Mike and Karen Nunns on May 27, 2020


Have governments effectively interpreted the financial effect of the pandemic on small businesses across Canada?  With regard to the federal government: No.  The more important question is, however: Does the federal government actually care?  The answer to that question is: If the health of Canadian small business is a concern to Trudeau’s bosses in China, then the federal government cares; otherwise, it cares not.  Oh, they can send out TV spots where the federal government says, “thank you” to front-line workers, but this is akin to someone wanting to show off each day thanking firemen for their bravery, so each night he goes off and starts another fire.  I do not matter to this government; you do not matter to this government.  They wring their hands after they’ve let the horse out of the barn, but all they care about is: a) making sure you don’t label the virus with regard to its place of origin, and b) ensuring you spend no time in contemplation of the fact that all of this could have been avoided in the first place, if the federal government had had the guts to say “Stay home!” to people from infected areas.  Sadly, in our new world order, with our new wonderful religion of Multiculturalism and its spawn, Political Correctness, firmly entrenched in First World society, it is probably a crime to even simply opine on such matters.

By Mike and Karen Nunns on May 27, 2020


The reality is small businesses cash flow from one month to another is slim. Being out of business for more than a month or two, with no cash flow will be the death sentence for many small businesses. Loans don’t work as this will only add to their reduction of cashflow later on. Asking them to rehire and pay 25% of a person’s salary is a joke. Wages is the largest cost. Their margins are not 25% in most small businesses; therefore,again they lose their cashflow and their business.

By Wayne Ray on May 27, 2020


This government only cares about the 1 percenters. They are lead by someone who knows nothing about small business or working for a living, so how on earth could they understand what it takes to run and maintain a small business.

By Liza Wiley on May 27, 2020


I am 68 years of age. I worked all my life then fell in at 52 yrs of age with doctors ordering me to stop work. I had my own business which I operated from 1976 to 2002. I had the option of contributing to CPP; I contributed.
Today’s pay out amounts fall very short of giving a dignified living to the CPP contributor.  We are in a situation were in Canada the largest sector of the population are retired seniors, who will jump start the economy to get past COVID 19? You need a consuming public, and that consuming public better have disposable income. Because without persons with money not buying meals, etc, we are in for a very long depression with crimes rates on the rise. Seniors need food, stores provide that, they need cars, dealerships provide that; and on and on it goes.

Regards   Andrew

By Andrew on May 21, 2020


The Government does not really know how this pandemic has affected the small business.  One of our long standing, local businesses had to close it’s doors completely, as the costs to keep the building (rent/mortgage, utilities, repairs & maintenance, etc) were killing them.  There may be too many stipulations, in regards to applying for pandemic assistance programs, that don’t include some of the very small business.

By Cathy on May 20, 2020


review the federal/provincial commercial rent assistance program where landlord if do not opt for it, the tenants still get some rental relief, to cope up

By NAVEED AHMAD on May 20, 2020


I think the government has tried.  Not as much would have been shut down if there was more focus on very early testing and tracking.  This should have been put in place as soon as there was the hint of the virus.  More focus should have been on retirement homes, veterans homes, concentrated plants where the bulk of the outbreaks have been.  I know it is easy to say this in hind sight but our seniors have taken the brunt of this virus.  What I worry about the most is the possible mass bankruptcies of small businesses and national debt that will have a tremendous lingering effect for many years to come.

By Nancy Campbell on May 19, 2020


Our federal government pretends to understand small business, but in reality, does not.  Cash flow is “KING” as you may know, for small businesses, and thus suspending your incoming revenues, but still having to pay out your static expenses (rent, utilities, insurance, property taxes,  etc.)  .  The emergency packages and programs offered to the small businesses fall short compared to what large corporation are receiving at what the public services are receiving.    It seems that we are left to fend for ourselves, and have little recourse to save our businesses.

As an example: I pay about $7,100 in monthly rent for 1,600 square feet of retail space.  My landlord will not use the federal/provincial commercial rent assistance program, and has only offered his tenants to defer our rent for the months of May and June,  to January 1, 2021.  He then requires that we pay him the deferred rent over 12 months at 5% interest, compounded daily.  In other word, he refuses to play fair ball with his tenants and sacrifice a little of his revenue as we have.  This is just one hurdle that many small businesses with razor-thin margins must face and deal with.   

Realize that when we begin to resume restricted operations, sales will likely take more than 6 months to get back to pre-virus levels, as our customers must feel confident, that society have the pandemic under control, and that it is “safe to get back into the water”.

Because this is a novel economic challenge, predicting the economic outcome is very subjective at this stage.

By Gaetan Ladouceur on May 07, 2020


The $2000 CERB has made it difficult to bring back laid off employees. The CWES is helpful but since the intention is to get individuals back to work or at least on the payroll, again the CERB is interfering with getting people back to their employment.
As for the $40,000!loan to small businesses, it does not take into account that many Franchisees own several franchises. If they each are set up under a separate corporation, they qualify for $40,000 for each business. On the other hand, if they are within one corporation, the corporation only qualifies if the 2019 wages are under 1.5 Million. Many Franchisees that I know are struggling to cover expenses but they do not qualify for a loan.

By Dan Merkley on May 06, 2020


I Know that the members of this government have not lived through a pandemic before, so all of this is new to each and every one of them. They are really trying their best, however many people/businesses are falling through the cracks. Sad to watch many of them closing due to great losses in capital.  If only the money had come sooner.

By Diane Woodham on May 06, 2020


Government tries but misses the mark

By Belle on May 06, 2020


Government tries but misses the mark

By Belle on May 06, 2020