New Canada Savings Bond Rates Set

On October 7, the Department of Finance announced the interest rates for Canada Savings Bonds that are available for sale until November 1. The announcement included the following rate table:


Canada Savings Bond
Series 114

Canada Premium Bond
Series 64



Interest rates for year beginning

Annual interest rate

Average annual rate of return if held to November 1 of the following year

Annual interest rate

Average annual compound rate of return if held to November 1 of the following year


Nov. 1, 2008

2.00%

2.00%

2.35%

2.35%

Nov. 1, 2009

TBA

TBA

2.50%

2.42%

Nov. 1, 2010

TBA

TBA

2.65%

2.50%


The rates for Series 114 will be extended to existing CSB bonds series 46-52, 54, 60, 66, 72, 78, 84, 90, 96, 102, and 108. The rates for CPB series 64 will be extended to existing CPB bonds series 3, 15, 34, and 46.

In addition, the maturity dates of CSB series 51 and 54 and CPB series 3, which mature this year, have been extended to November 1, 2018.

With the equity markets in melt-down mode, many investors are looking for a safer place to park their money. With the current inflation rate hovering around 3.5% and interest on Canada Savings Bonds being taxable annually on a bond-year basis, let's take a look at how a typical taxpayer with a marginal tax rate of 40% might fare by investing in one of the new Canada Premium Bonds over the next three years (where rates have been set).

Example: $100,000 invested in October 2008 in Canada Premium Bonds by a taxpayer whose marginal tax rate is 40%. Inflation rate assumed to be 3.5%
 
Current $
 
Future $
Year
Capital
Interest Earned
Value of investment
Income Tax Payable
Net value after tax
 
Net value after tax
2008
$100,000.00
 
 
 
 
 
 
2009
$100,000.00
$2,350.00
$102,350.00
$940.00
$101,410.00
 
$97,980.68
2010
$100,000.00
$2,558.75
$104,908.75
$1,023.50
$103,885.25
 
$96,977.99
2011
$100,000.00
$2,780.08
$107,688.83
$1,112.03
$106,576.80
 
$96,126.17

Notes:

1. Each year the taxpayer will have to pay the tax on the accrued interest (November to October) in spite of the fact that the interest has yet to be received and is therefore not available to pay the tax bill.

2. The average interest rate (stated as 2.5%) is reduced by income taxes to approximately 1.5%.

3. After 3 years, in current dollars, the $100,000 investment will have grown to $106,576.80 (after taxes). However, if inflation continues at 3.5% per year, that $106,576.80 will be worth only $96,126.17 in today's dollars. The value of the investment therefore is reduced by approximately 2% in real dollars each year.